lannister

Tywin Lannister and subtle symbolism

tywin lannisterWARNING: SPOILERS AHEAD FOR EVERYTHING RELATED TO GAME OF THRONES!

Game of Thrones is praised for many things: the brilliant casting of roles, the fresh take on an already interesting story, the fantastic locations and more. However, like in many pieces of art, the true brilliance lies in the little details, and George R.R. Martin and the creators of the show have put quite some effort in hiding subtle symbolism throughout the show (which Martin already did in the books), and one of the characters they like to use for that is the always threatening Tywin Lannister, head of house Lannister and all-round badass.

Everyone who has read the books knows that Martin is a sucker for “signs and portents”, mysterious symbolism that foreshadows future events or abstracts current situations. When the Starks find the litter of dire wolf cubs, it’s no coincidence that there’s one for each of them. It’s also no coincidence that Jon receives the albino cub. It’s damn symbolism, linking the Stark children to their dire wolves (some more than others). The books offer a few other examples, but the show is also filled with them. Tywin Lannister is used for two really obvious portents, at least if someone pays attention.

In the first season, during a conversation with Jaime, Tywin is busy skinning a stag. Well, who’s coat-of-arms is the stag? Exactly! And who dies during a hunting “incident”? Precisely! Coincidence? I think not. The great touch in this scene is how careful Tywin empties and skins the animal. He shows the same precision in this craft as he does in politics, a magnificent method to portray his lethal accuracy.

It turns out that Tywin has a thing for the simple things in life, as we see him fishing in this deleted scene from season 3. Next to discovering how vigorous Pycelle actually is, we also see what Tywin was fishing up: trout (at least I think they’re trout). He hands the basket full of fish to Pycelle, ordering him to bring them to the kitchen ’cause he wants them “for supper”. Hm, I heard the Freys also like some trout for supper…

Again, it’s subtle, but that’s what makes it great. I can’t wait to see more of these little hints in future episodes. Also, I can’t wait to see more of Tywin. He’s such a badass!

Advertisements

How Jaime Lannister got on my good side

Before you read any further: spoiler alert. This text contains massive spoilers about the A Song of Ice and Fire books, and especially the events in A Clash of Kings and A Storm of Swords. If you still want to enjoy those books, better read something else on this blog. Please, stay on this blog. It will be worth your time.

With that out of the way, let me tell you something about Jaime Lannister. Ah, what hasn’t been said about this smug-faced sisterlover already. With his good looks and his charming ways, he conquers many Westerosi hearts, but his own only beats for his twin sister. While being the father of a bunch of incest children, he still does his best to be the awesome member of the Kingsguard everybody thinks he is, despite the fact that he already killed a King he had sworn to protect. He has so much to hate, and many viewers of the HBO show and readers of the first two books really hate this arrogant tool. Until a few days ago, I was one of them.

You see, if you make it to the third book of the A Song of Ice and Fire saga, you will discover an entirely new side of Jaime. While trying to make his way to King’s Landing with Brienne, the two get caught by the rather brutish and primitive Brave Companions, and in a sadistic turn of events, Jaime Lannister loses his sword-hand. That’s right: this great knight loses what makes him so feared and famous, and he sure has a serious internal crisis about it. However, instead of turning into a wimpy idiot who just complains about how cruel the world is, Jaime makes up plans to get the most out of the situation, and even starts to appreciate the companionship and bravery of the female knight Brienne. When he gets a safe escort back to King’s Landing without Brienne, he decides that he can’t just leave her behind, rides back to Harrenhal and saves her from a bear, which she had to fight with a blunt tournament sword. Of course, he keeps his cool through all of this, almost never complaining about his lost hand, while risking his life and safety for a woman he could just as easily hate.

Ladies and gentleman, Jaime Lannister is, officially, my new favourite character of the entire saga.

Seriously, it’s impressive how Jaime goes from charming jerk to handicapped good guy in just a few chapters. Even better, the entire transformation feels plausible and is well-written. It’s great to see a tough, badass character like Jaime developing soft spots, and that almost makes you forget that he is the father of several incestuous children and the member of the family responsible for Eddard Stark’s death (though you could write that one up to Joffrey’s sheer madness). It also makes him believable, and that was just the thing he needed after being my favourite character to hate (next to Joffrey. God, I hate that brat).

So, next time you meet a fictional character that seems to be a prick, don’t judge him too fast. Snape turned out okay, and Jaime Lannister seems to be a semi-good guy as well. Hate and despise them while you can, but respect them as soon as they find redemption for their douchery.

Now, if you’ll excuse me, I got books to read.